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Russian Journal of Marine Biology

, Volume 45, Issue 4, pp 313–319 | Cite as

Use of Satellite Data for the Estimation of the Specific Growth Rate of Phytoplankton in the Surface Layer of the Black Sea

  • Z. Z. FinenkoEmail author
  • I. V. Kovalyova
  • V. V. Suslin
Article
  • 13 Downloads

Abstract

A regional model is proposed for the estimation of the specific growth rate of phytoplankton in the sea surface layer using satellite data. The model is based on phytoplankton photosynthesis rate and biomass in organic carbon units. The phytoplankton photosynthesis rate was calculated based on ecological and physiological characteristics that were previously obtained for the Black Sea. The input parameters of the model are the chlorophyll concentration in the surface layer, water temperature, the intensity of the photosynthetic active radiation falling on the sea surface, the depth of the mixed layer, and the diffuse light attenuation coefficient. Seasonal variations in specific growth rate of phytoplankton were estimated for deep-water and near-Danube areas. The maximum values were found in the coastal area in May–June, the minimum values were observed in deep waters before the spring maximum of phytoplankton. The maximum and minimum values differed by a factor 5. The measured and calculated values of phytoplankton specific growth rate at individual stations and in selected extensive areas of the sea were fairly close. The model can be used for rapid estimation of the specific growth rate of phytoplankton in the sea surface layer using satellite data.

Keywords:

specific growth rate phytoplankton Black Sea satellite data phytoplankton biomass chlorophyll a concentration 

Notes

FUNDING

This study was performed with support from the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences (program no. 49 “Interaction of Physical, Chemical and Biological Processes in the World Ocean”); it was financed in part by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (“An Alternative Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Biomass and Growth Rate in the Black Sea Using Satellite Data”, project no. 16-05-00076); by the state assignment project “Functional, Metabolic and Toxicological Aspects of Aquatic Organisms and Their Populations in Environments with Different Physicochemical Regimes” (no. AAAA-A18-118021490093-4); and by the state assignment project “Development of Methods of Operational Oceanology on the Basis of Interdisciplinary Studies of Processes of Formation and Evolution of Marine Environment and Mathematical Modeling Using Remote Sensing and Contact Measurement Data” (no. 0827-2018-0002).

COMPLIANCE WITH ETHICAL STANDARDS

Conflict of interest. The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Statement on the welfare of animals. This article does not contain any studies involving animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. Z. Finenko
    • 1
    Email author
  • I. V. Kovalyova
    • 1
  • V. V. Suslin
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Marine Biological Research, Russian Academy of SciencesSevastopolRussia
  2. 2.Marine Hydrophysical Institute, Russian Academy of SciencesSevastopolRussia

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