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Doklady Earth Sciences

, Volume 484, Issue 1, pp 45–47 | Cite as

Sources and Provenances of Late Cenozoic Sand Deposits of the Ol’khon Island (Baikal Rift Zone)

  • A. B. KotovEmail author
  • T. M. Skovitina
  • V. P. Kovach
  • E. V. Sklyarov
  • T. V. Donskaya
  • D. V. Lopatin
  • Yu. V. Plotkina
  • E. V. Tolmacheva
  • B. M. Gorokhovskii
  • I. N. Buchnev
GEOLOGY
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Geochronological (LA–ICP–MS) U–Th–Pb studies of detrital zircon of the Late Cenozoic sand deposits on Ol’khon Island have been performed. It has been shown that their main source is represented by Early Paleozoic igneous and metamorphic complexes of the Ol’khon Terrane of the Central-Asian Mobile belt and Late Carboniferous–Early Permian granitoids of the Angara–Vitim batholite. Sands from the source were transported over a distance of no less than 100 km. It is supposed that it was effectuated by strong air flows, over the ice on the Lake Baikal in particular.

Notes

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. Kotov
    • 1
    Email author
  • T. M. Skovitina
    • 2
  • V. P. Kovach
    • 1
  • E. V. Sklyarov
    • 2
    • 3
  • T. V. Donskaya
    • 2
  • D. V. Lopatin
    • 4
  • Yu. V. Plotkina
    • 1
  • E. V. Tolmacheva
    • 1
  • B. M. Gorokhovskii
    • 1
  • I. N. Buchnev
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Precambrian Geology and Geochronology, Russian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2. Institute of the Earth’s Crust, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of SciencesIrkutskRussia
  3. 3.Far East Federal UniversityVladivostokRussia
  4. 4.Institute of Earth Sciences, St. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia

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