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Absorption of Nitrous Oxide from Air by Aqueous and Organic Solutions

  • M. P. GorbachevaEmail author
  • E. P. Krasavina
  • L. V. Mizina
  • I. A. Rumer
  • V. B. Krapukhin
  • V. V. Kulemin
  • V. A. Lavrikov
  • S. A. Kulyukhin
TECHNOLOGY OF ORGANIC SUBSTANCES

Abstract

Findings from a study of the N2O absorption from an air flow in various aqueous and organic solutions at 293–298 K were reported. The maximum N2O absorption reached under the experimental conditions for water (~22–24%) and a saturated solution of K2Cr2O7 in concentrated H2SO4 with and without Al2O3 (~34 and ~30%, respectively) was determined. In concentrated HNO3 and NH4OH solutions, as well as in 1.0 mol/L NaOH and N2H4nH2O solutions, the degree of the N2O absorption varied within a range from ~7.5 to ~11.5%. A similar value of absorption was also found in 0.5 mol/L (NH2)2CO (~11%). In other solutions, the degree of the N2O absorption was not more than ~4.0%. In the studied organic solutions, the degree of the N2O absorption was found to be less than ~12%.

Keywords:

nitrous oxide absorption solutions 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. P. Gorbacheva
    • 1
    Email author
  • E. P. Krasavina
    • 1
  • L. V. Mizina
    • 1
  • I. A. Rumer
    • 1
  • V. B. Krapukhin
    • 1
  • V. V. Kulemin
    • 1
  • V. A. Lavrikov
    • 1
  • S. A. Kulyukhin
    • 1
  1. 1.Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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