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Russian Journal of Physical Chemistry A

, Volume 93, Issue 6, pp 1151–1154 | Cite as

Studying the Interaction between Water Vapor and a γ-Al2O3 Surface by IR Spectroscopy

  • S. D. BadmaevEmail author
  • E. A. Paukshtis
  • V. D. Belyaev
  • V. A. Sobyanin
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF SURFACE PHENOMENA
  • 8 Downloads

Abstract

The interaction between a γ-Al2O3 surface and vapors of H2O and D2O is studied via IR spectroscopy. It is shown that surface hydroxyl groups of ОН and OD form at temperatures as low as 100–200°С. It is estimated that these hydroxyl groups exhibit Brønsted acidity, and their interaction with NH3 leads to the formation of NH\(_{4}^{ + }\) ions.

Keywords:

γ-Al2O3 water adsorption IR spectroscopy Lewis acid sites Brønsted acid sites 

Notes

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This work was supported by Ministry of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation, project no. AAAA-A17-117041710088-0.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. D. Badmaev
    • 1
    Email author
  • E. A. Paukshtis
    • 1
  • V. D. Belyaev
    • 1
  • V. A. Sobyanin
    • 1
  1. 1.Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of SciencesNovosibirskRussia

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