Advertisement

Journal of Structural Chemistry

, Volume 59, Issue 3, pp 664–668 | Cite as

Crystal Structure and Properties of [Rh2(H2O)8(μ-OH)2](NO3)4·4H2O

  • S. N. Berdyugin
  • D. B. Vasilchenko
  • I. A. Baidina
  • S. V. Korenev
  • I. V. Korolkov
Article
  • 10 Downloads

Abstract

A procedure to synthesize (μ-hydroxo)bis-pentaaquarhodium(III) nitrate tetrahydrate [Rh2(H2O)8(μ-OH)2](NO3)4·4H2O from potassium hexachlororhodiate(III) is elaborated. The compound is isolated into the solid phase and structurally characterized. The crystallographic data are as follows: a = 5.8763(2) Å, b = 9.4749(4) Å, c = 9.6249(3) Å, α = 79.905(1)°, β = 84.324(1)°, γ = 82.922(1)°, space group P-1, Z = 1, ρcalc = 2.240 g/cm3. The compound is soluble in water, ethanol, and acetone. Hydrolysis takes place in concentrated nitric acid with the formation of mononuclear aqua- and aquanitrate complexes. Thermal decomposition of the salt at a temperature above 580 °C leads to the formation of a single product–rhodium(III) oxide.

Keywords

synthesis single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis polynuclear complexes bridging OH ligand rhodium complexes polycondensation of hydroxo complexes rhodium(III) nitrate 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. S. Forrester and G. H. Ayres. J. Phys. Chem., 1959, 63(11), 1979–1981.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    D. Vasilchenko, S. Vorob'eva, S. Tkachev, I. Baidina, A. Belyaev, S. Korenev, L. Solovyov, and A. Vasiliev. Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., 2016, 2016(23), 3822–3828.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. N. Vorobieva, et al. J. Struct. Chem., 2015, 56(8), 1606–1612CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. B. Bardin and V. I. Shapiro. J. Anal. Chem., 1970, 25(7), 1353–1359.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    D. B. Vasilchenko, S. N. Berdyugin, S. V. Korenev, S. O'Kennedy, and W. J. Gerber. Inorg. Chem., 2017, 56(17), 10724–10734.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    S. N. Berdyugin and D. V. Vasilchenko. Abstracts of the IX International Conference for Young Chemists “Mendeleev-2015”, Saint-Petrsburg, 2015.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    B. N. Ivanov-Emin, N. A. Nevskaya, B. E. Zaitsev, and V. I. Tsirel’nikov. Russ. J. Inorg.Chem., 1983, 28(4),982.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    R. Cervini, G. D. Fallon, and L. Spiccia. Inorg. Chem., 1991, 30(5), 831–836.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    K. Nakamoto. Infrared and Raman Spectra of Inorganic and Coordination Compounds. Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. Mink, C. Németh, L. Hajba, M. Sandström, and P. Goggin. J. Mol. Struct., 2003, 661-662, 141–151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    L. Spiccia. Inorg. Chim. Acta, 2004, 357(10), 2799–2817.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    G. M. Sheldrick. Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A Found. Crystallogr., 2008, 64(1), 112–122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Bruker, SADABS, Bruker AXS Inc, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, 2001.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. N. Berdyugin
    • 1
  • D. B. Vasilchenko
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. A. Baidina
    • 1
  • S. V. Korenev
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. V. Korolkov
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian BranchRussian Academy of SciencesNovosibirskRussia
  2. 2.Novosibirsk State UniversityNovosibirskRussia

Personalised recommendations