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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 39–58 | Cite as

Community-Based Sustainability in an Export Dependent Resource Economy: the British Columbian Experiment to Deliver Sustainability in one Province

  • Tony Jackson
  • John Curry
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of the Journal of Transatlantic Studies 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Jackson
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Curry
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Town and Regional PlanningUniversity of DundeeScotland
  2. 2.Department of Environmental PlanningUniversity of Northern British ColumbiaCanada

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