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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 208–213 | Cite as

Tests of bednet traps (Mbita traps) for monitoring mosquito populations and time of biting in Tanzania and possible impact of prolonged insecticide treated net use

  • Nafisah Braimah
  • Chris Drakeley
  • Eliningaya Kweka
  • Frank Mosha
  • Michelle Helinski
  • Helen Pates
  • Caroline Maxwell
  • Thedy Massawe
  • Michael G. Kenward
  • Chris CurtisEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Mosquito traps known as Mbita traps made from modified bednets according to a design developed in Kenya were compared with Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps for their ability to catch anopheline and culicine mosquitoes in several different villages in northern Tanzania. The results confirmed those recently reported in Kenya, that Mbita traps catch significantly fewer mosquitoes than CDC traps. Statistical analysis using a Poisson log linear model with random effects for the trap counts showed that the ratio of the catches with the two types of trap was not consistent in the different villages. Thus, we doubt whether the Mbita trap would be a reliable substitute for CDC traps. In one trial, the catches made at different hours of the night with the two types of trap indicated that in villages where insecticide treated nets (ITNs) had been used for some years, somewhat more of the Anopheles biting occurred early and late in the night, whereas in villages with no history of ITN use, biting was concentrated in the middle of the night. This suggests that behavioural adaptation to avoid contact with ITNs may be beginning to evolve.

Résumé

Les pièges à moustiques connus sous le nom de pièges Mbita, fabriqués avec du tissu de moustiquaire selon un modèle dèveloppé au Kenya, ont été comparés avec des pièges lumineux CDC pour leur capacité de piégeages des moustiques des genres Anopheles et Culex dans plusieurs localités du Nord de la Tanzanie. Les résultats confirment ceux récemment obtenus au Kenya, à savoir que les pièges Mbita attrapent moins de moustiques que les pièges CDC. Des analyses statistiques utilisant des modèles de Poisson log linéaires, avec une distribution au hasard des captures par piège, montrent que le rapport des captures entre les deux pièges n’est pas similaire dans les différents villages. Aussi, nous nous interrogeons sur l’utilisation des pièges Mbita a la place des pièges CDC. Dans l’un des essais, les captures réalis`ees à différentes heures de la nuit avec les deux types de pièges, indiquent que dans les villages où les ITNs ont été utilisés plusieurs années, les piqûres d’Anopheles sont observées plus tôt ou plus tard que dans les villages préservés des traitements ITNs où les piqûres sont observées principalement en milieu de nuit. Ce résultat suggère un début de changement du comportement des Anopheles afin d’éviter le contact avec les ITNs.

Key words

mosquito traps Mbita trap CDC light trap Tanzania time of mosquito biting insecticide treated nets 

Mots clés

piège à moustiques piège Mbita piège lumineux CDC heure de piqûre des moustiques moustiquaire imprégnée d’insecticide 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nafisah Braimah
    • 1
    • 2
  • Chris Drakeley
    • 1
    • 3
  • Eliningaya Kweka
    • 3
  • Frank Mosha
    • 3
  • Michelle Helinski
    • 2
  • Helen Pates
    • 1
    • 2
  • Caroline Maxwell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Thedy Massawe
    • 2
  • Michael G. Kenward
    • 1
  • Chris Curtis
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineLondonUK
  2. 2.NIMR Ubwari Field StationMuhezaTangaTanzania
  3. 3.Joint Malaria ProgrammeMoshiTanzania

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