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Development

, Volume 58, Issue 4, pp 452–462 | Cite as

Industrialization in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

  • Nobuya Haraguchi
  • Kazuki Kitaoka
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Abstract

In contrast to the Millennium Development Goals, the newly established sustainable development goals (SDGs) aim not only to eradicate poverty worldwide, but also to ensure inclusive and sustainable long-term growth for continuous improvements in human well-being. As industrialization can be an essential driver for achieving all SDGs, this article illustrates how manufacturing development can be made more inclusive and sustainable for low- and middle-income countries, in particular from the perspective of structural change.

Keywords

sustainable development goals poverty eradication structural change inclusive manufacturing development 

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Copyright information

© Society for International Development 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UNIDO Institute for Capacity DevelopmentUnited Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO)ViennaAustria

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