Theorizing the Politics of Protest: Contemporary Debates on Civil Disobedience

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Correspondence to Çiğdem Çıdam.

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Çıdam, Ç., Scheuerman, W.E., Delmas, C. et al. Theorizing the Politics of Protest: Contemporary Debates on Civil Disobedience. Contemp Polit Theory 19, 513–546 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41296-020-00392-7

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