Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 28–42 | Cite as

International societal movements, the other, psychological borders, and large-scale voter behavior during the 2016 United States presidential election

  • Vamık D. Volkan
Article
  • 37 Downloads

Abstract

The present world has evolved as a global neighborhood. Cultural and religious confrontations, floods of refugees, and acts of terrorism have increased concerns regarding large-group identities. The metaphorical question “Who are we now?” has spread worldwide. This paper explores how this question has influenced a large number of American voters during the recent presidential election.

Keywords

non-sameness chosen traumas chosen glories entitlement ideology White Nativism narcissistic leader 

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vamık D. Volkan
    • 1
  1. 1.CharlottesvilleUSA

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