The effect of fake news on anger and negative word-of-mouth: moderating roles of religiosity and conservatism

Abstract

This study aims to explore how consumers process and respond to fake news. The study hypothesizes that fake news that induces one’s belief and values increases the level of anger that eventually affects negative word-of-mouth (n-WoM). The study also posits that religiosity and conservatism moderate the relationship between anger and n-WoM. Data were collected using quasi-experimental repeated measures factorial design, 1 × 2 within subjects. A total of 188 participants responded to the experiment. The study uses one-way repeated measures design ANOVA and MEMORE to test the effects of moderation for repeated measures. Religiosity and conservatism moderate the relationship between anger and negative word-of-mouth. The study’s limitations include the limited dimension measured for religiosity and not differentiating the denominations of Islam.

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Correspondence to Zazli Lily Wisker.

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Appendices

Appendix

Imagine you were browsing one of your social media sites, and you happen to see information about the following […] […]. The respondents were randomly exposed to the stimuli. A series of questions was used to capture their perceptions.

Stimulus 1 (fake news, low anger)

Your favorite fried chicken restaurant that has halal certification donated the leftover cooked chicken before closing at night.

Stimulus 2 (fake news, high anger)

Your favorite fried chicken restaurant that has halal certification is reported to supply non-halal chicken in several outlets nationwide due to shortage of halal chicken.

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Wisker, Z.L., McKie, R.N. The effect of fake news on anger and negative word-of-mouth: moderating roles of religiosity and conservatism. J Market Anal (2021). https://doi.org/10.1057/s41270-020-00101-8

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Keywords

  • Fake news
  • Anger
  • Religiosity
  • Conservatism
  • Negative word-of-mouth