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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 506–531 | Cite as

On distant shores: the transatlantic foundations of child reform in the mid-nineteenth century

  • William McGovernEmail author
Original Article
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Abstract

This essay sketches the development of a transatlantic network of reformers devoted to solving the problem of juvenile delinquency. It argues that during the middle of the nineteenth century juvenile reform practices spread through a web of newly created reform and social science associations in Europe and the USA. Through these organisations, experts and reformatory administrators developed personal and professional relationships. Child reformers shared papers and publications, and many of them travelled across the Atlantic to attend organisational meetings and tour each other’s institutions. Focusing on the interactions of several key members, this article illuminates the extensive and understudied exchange of ideas that shaped approaches to combating juvenile delinquency on both sides of the Atlantic.

Keywords

Transatlantic cooperation Reform Juvenile delinquency Institution building Transnational 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a research travel grant from the University of California, San Diego History Department and a Kakenhi incentive grant from Akita International University. The author wishes to thank the generous assistance of Dale Freeman of the Archives and Special Collections at University of Massachusetts, Boston, Jason Wood of the Simmons College Archives, Simmons College, Boston, and David Emeney of the Bristol Museums, Galleries, and Archives, Bristol, UK.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Akita International UniversityYuwaJapan

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