Advertisement

International Politics Reviews

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 111–115 | Cite as

Response from Stroup and Wong

  • Sarah StroupEmail author
  • Wendy Wong
The Forum

We appreciate the opportunity to respond to the thoughtful comments on The Authority Trap from three researchers committed to excellent and innovative scholarship on international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) and transnational activism. Clifford Bob, Mette Eilstrup-Sangiovanni, and Jennifer Hadden each raise important questions about the methodology, causal claims, and implications of our argument. Our goals for the book were to conceptualize and measure authority across INGOs and demonstrate how authority can both enable and constrain political activity. We also sought to unify discussions of INGOs across different sectors. Below, we briefly discuss the origins of our argument before addressing four concerns raised by the reviewers: becoming a leading INGO, measuring authority, the drivers of INGO strategic choices, and the influence of INGOs.

Our initial interest in this project arose from debates about the power of INGOs in global politics. As the others in this forum have...

References

  1. Bob, C. (2005). The marketing of rebellion. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bob, C. (2012). The global right wing and the clash of world politics. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Carpenter, C. (2014). Lost causes: Agenda vetting in global issue networks and the shaping of human security. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Eilstrup-Sangiovanni, M., and Phelps Bondaroff, T. (2014). From advocacy to confrontation: direct enforcement by environmental NGOs. International Studies Quarterly, 58(2), 348–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hadden, J. (2015). Networks in contention. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Korey, W. (1998). NGOs and the universal declaration of human rights. New York: St. Martin’s Press.Google Scholar
  7. Stroup, S. (2012). Borders among activists: International NGOs in the United States, Britain, and France. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Stroup, S., and Murdie, A. (2012). There’s no place like home: Explaining international NGO advocacy. The Review of International Organizations, 7(4), 425–448.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Tarrow, S. (2005). The new transnational activism. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Wong, W. (2012). Internal affairs: How the structure of NGOs transforms human rights. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Middlebury CollegeMiddleburyUSA
  2. 2.Univerity of TorontoTorontoCanada

Personalised recommendations