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Secularism and the politics of translation

  • Andrea Cassatella
Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

This article investigates the politics of translation at work in contemporary theories of secularism. It turns to the thought of Jacques Derrida in order to challenge liberal and more critical perspectives. Without a complex analysis of translation and its ethico-political effects, the revisitation of secularism remains deficient, leaving the liberal politics of translation exclusionary and that of their critics ineffective. Pointing to the resources Derrida offers for a deeper understanding of the nature, political stakes, and implications of translation, this article illuminates an understudied and yet crucial dimension of the relationship between religion and politics, and more generally of public life.

Keywords

Derrida language religion secularism sovereignty translation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Limited 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bard College for Arts and SciencesAl-Quds UniversityJerusalemIsrael

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