An Empirical Examination of Same- and Other-Gender Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Abstract

This study examines sexual harassment (SH) whichinvolves members of the same gender, either male orfemale. Data are taken from the 1988 Department ofDefense Survey of Sex Roles in the Active Duty Military. Separate comparisons for male (38% White, 31%Black, and 31% ‘other’) and female (48%White, 27% Black, and 25% ‘other’) targetsare made between sameand other-gender SH related to fourmajor components of a conceptual model proposed by Fitzgerald,Drasgow, Hulin, Gelfand, & Magley (1997). Thesecomponents include sexual harassment behaviors, personalvulnerability, target response styles, and consequences of the SH for the target. The sexualorientation of targets and perpetrators is notconsidered because data were unavailable. Results reveala number of meaningful differences between sameandother-gender SH. The most striking result is that maletargets of same-gender SH experience consequences thatare significantly more pervasive and severe than thoseexperienced by male targets of other-gender SH.Organizational implications are discussed.

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Dubois, C.L.Z., Knapp, D.E., Faley, R.H. et al. An Empirical Examination of Same- and Other-Gender Sexual Harassment in the Workplace. Sex Roles 39, 731–749 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018860101629

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Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Conceptual Model
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Meaningful Difference
  • Experience Consequence