Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida

Abstract

The non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida, was surveyed during 1995–1997 as part of a community pollinator survey. One hundred and thirty one sampling trips were made to four areas of Everglades National Park (Shark Valley, Chekika, Long Pine Key (LPK), and Flamingo). Species–month curves indicate that the sampling effort resulted in capture of most of the flower-visiting animal species in the park. A total of 143 insects and 1 bird species were recorded. Diptera were the most diverse group (55 spp.), followed by Lepidoptera (42 spp.) and non-apoid Hymenoptera (34 spp.). The majority of species were rare (56% of species were found on fewer than five trips). The highest diversity of species was found from January to May during the peak flowering period in some plant communities. The greatest total diversity was found in Long Pine Key and Shark Valley had the lowest diversity. Chekika and Flamingo were intermediate in diversity. Animals visited 178 plant species,∼26% of the potentially animal pollinated Angiosperm diversity of the park. Twenty-five species of plants had only non-apoid flower visitors; the majority of these species had only visits by Lepidoptera. Potentially important pollinator species include members of the Syrphidae, Coleoptera, and Lepidoptera. However, many of the flower-visiting species may not be effective pollinators. This study will be useful for designing sampling protocols for including invertebrates in assessments of ecological restoration underway in the Everglades ecosystem and for more detailed studies of the importance of non-apoid flower-visitors as effective pollinators.

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Pascarella, J.B., Waddington, K. & Neal, P. Non-apoid flower-visiting fauna of Everglades National Park, Florida. Biodiversity and Conservation 10, 551–566 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1016688627518

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  • Biodiversity
  • Everglades National Park
  • Florida
  • pollinators
  • Syrphidae