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CA-125 Concentrations in the Serum and Pregnancy Outcome in IVF Cycles

  • Alfred W. Brandenberger
  • Nicolas A. Bersinger
  • Peter R. Huber
  • Elisabeth Berger
  • Patrick Glanzmann
  • Martin H. Birkhaeuser
Article

Abstract

Purpose: CA-125 has been proposed as a potential marker for endometrial receptivity in assisted reproduction. This study was designed to evaluate whether the levels of CA-125 in the serum of patients undergoing IVF–embryo transfer (ET) is correlated with the outcome.

Methods: Levels of serum CA-125 were measured on the day before and on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration, ovum pickup (OPU), and ET in 74 patients undergoing 100 IVF cycles between January 1994 and March 1995. Patients were treated with a midluteal-phase gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist protocol and follicular-phase human menopausal gonadotropin.

Results: One hundred oocyte retrievals resulted in 91 ETs, and 22 clinical pregnancies (22%/OPU and 24.2%/ET). The live-born rate was 21%/OPU and 23.1%/ET. Neither the CA-125 serum levels nor their increase from the day of hCG until the day of ET showed any prognostic significance to the outcome of IVF, and they were not correlated with the endometrium thickness or the number of oocytes retrieved or fertilized.

Conclusions: The CA-125 serum levels in conventional IVF cycles were not correlated with the IVF outcome and yielded no prognostic information in a GnRH agonist down-regulation protocol.

CA-125 in vitro fertilization endometrium receptivity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfred W. Brandenberger
    • 1
  • Nicolas A. Bersinger
    • 1
  • Peter R. Huber
    • 2
  • Elisabeth Berger
    • 1
  • Patrick Glanzmann
    • 1
  • Martin H. Birkhaeuser
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of BernBernSwitzerland
  2. 2.Hormone and Tumormarker Laboratory, Department of Central LaboratoriesUniversity HospitalBaselSwitzerland

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