Advertisement

Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

, Volume 16, Issue 9, pp 483–487 | Cite as

Relationship of the Human Cumulus-Free Oocyte Maturational Profile with In Vitro Outcome Parameters After Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

  • Fu-Jen Huang
  • Shiuh-Young Chang
  • Meng-Yin Tsai
  • Yi-Chi Lin
  • Fu-Tsai Kung
  • Jick-Fuu Wu
  • Ying-Jen Lu
Article

Abstract

Purpose: We investigated whether the human oocyte maturational profile at the removal of cumulus/corona cells affects the fertilization rate and subsequent embryo quality after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

Methods: A total of 1011 oocytes from 150 cycles was included in this retrospective analysis. Cumulus-free oocytes that were in prophase or metaphase I of meiosis at the removal of cumulus/corona cells were incubated in vitro until they reached metaphase II (in vitro-matured oocytes) and were then immediately injected with a single spermatozoa. Oocytes that were in metaphase II at the removal of cumulus/corona cells (MII oocytes) received sperm injection after 3–4 hr of preinjection incubation.

Results:The fertilization rate of the MII oocytes was significantly higher than that of in vitro-matured oocytes (81 vs 62%; P < 0.001). The cleavage rates were similar in the two groups (MII oocytes, 94%; in vitro-matured oocytes, 91%). However, MII oocytes had significantly higher percentages of good-quality embryos (grade 1–3 embryos, 87 vs 58%, P < 0.001) and embryos with high cumulative embryo scores (score 10–32 embryos, 62 vs 33%, P < 0.001). The mean cumulative embryo score of MII oocytes after fertilization was also higher than that of in vitro-matured oocytes (12.1 ± 3.8 vs 8.8 ± 3.4; P = 0.014).

Conclusions: MII oocytes that extruded the first polar body at the removal of cumulus/corona cells had better fertilization rates and embryo morphology than in vitro-matured oocytes that extruded the first polar body following the removal of cumulus/corona cells and in vitro culture.

embryo quality fertilization rate in vitro maturation intracytoplasmic sperm injection oocyte maturity 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. 1.
    Leibfried-Rutledge ML, Florman HM, First NL: The molecular biology of Mammalian oocyte maturation. In The Molecular Biology of Fertilization, H Schatten, G Schatten (eds). New York, Academic Press, pp 259-275Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bachvarova R, Paynton BV: Expression of repetitive sequences in mouse oocytes. In Molecular Approaches to Developmental Biology, RA Firtel, EH Davidson (eds). New York, Alan R. Liss, 1987, pp 67-76Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dozortsev D, De Sutter P, Dhont M: Behaviour of spermatozoa in human oocytes displaying no or one pronucleus after intracy-toplasmic sperm injection. Hum Reprod 1994;9:2139-2144Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dominko T, First NL: Timing of meiotic progression in bovine oocytes and its effect on early embryo development. Mol Reprod Dev 1997;47:456-467Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Chang SY, Lee CL, Wang ML, Hu ML, Lai YM, Chang MY, Soong YK: No detrimental effects in delaying initiation of gonadotropin administration after pituitary desensitization with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. Fertil Steril 1993;59:183-186Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    World Health Organization: WHO Laboratory Manual for Examination Semen and Sperm-Cervical Mucus Interaction, 3rd ed. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1992Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kruger TF, Menkveld R, Stander FS, Lombard CJ, Van der Merwe JP, Van Zyl JA, Smith K: Sperm morphologic features as a prognostic factor in in vitro fertilization. Fertil Steril 1986;46:1118-1123Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    McClure RD, Nunes L, Tom R: Semen manipulation: improved sperm recovery and function with a two-layer Percoll gradient. Fertil Steril 1989;51:874-887Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Silber SJ, Nagy Z, Liu J, Tournaye H, Lissens W, Ferec C, Liebaers I, Devroey P, Van Steirteghem AC: The use of epididymal and testicular spermatozoa for intracytoplasmic sperm injection: The genetic implications for male infertility. Hum Reprod 1995;10:2031-2043Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Chang SY, Tsai MY: Deletion of azoospermic factor genes in Chinese men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia. J Assist Reprod Genet 1999;16:259-262.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Palermo G, Joris H, Devroey P, Van Steirteghem AC: Pregnancies after intracytoplasmic injection of single spermatozoa into an oocyte. Lancet 1992;340:17-18Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Veeck LL: Preembryo grading. In Atlas of the Human Oocyte and Early Conceptus. Baltimore, MD, Williams and Wilkins, 1991, Vol 2, pp 121-149Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Janssenswillen C, Nagy ZP, Van Steirteghem A: Maturation of human cumulus-free germinal vesicle-stage oocytes to metaphase II by coculture with monolayer Vero cells. Hum Rreprod 1995;10:375-378Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Sirard MA, Florman HM, Leibfried-Rutledge ML, Barnes FL, Sims ML, First NL: Timing of nuclear progression and protein synthesis necessary for meiotic maturation of bovine oocytes. Biol Reprod 1989;40:1257-1263Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Kubiak JZ: Mouse oocytes gradually develop the capacity for activation during the metaphase II arrest. Dev Biol 1989;136:537-545Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Kito S, Bavister BD: Male pronuclear formation and early embryonic development of hamster oocytes matured in vitro with gonadotropins, amino acids and cysteamine. J Reprod Fertil 1997;110:35-46Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fu-Jen Huang
    • 1
  • Shiuh-Young Chang
    • 1
  • Meng-Yin Tsai
    • 1
  • Yi-Chi Lin
    • 1
  • Fu-Tsai Kung
    • 1
  • Jick-Fuu Wu
    • 1
  • Ying-Jen Lu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial HospitalNiao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung County, TaiwanRepublic of China

Personalised recommendations