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Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

, Volume 15, Issue 10, pp 579–582 | Cite as

A Matched Study to Determine Whether Low-Dose Aspirin Without Heparin Improves Pregnancy Rates Following Frozen Embryo Transfer and/or Affects Endometrial Sonographic Parameters

  • Jerome H. Check
  • Carole Dietterich
  • Deborah Lurie
  • Ahmad Nazari
  • James Chuong
Article

Abstract

Purpose: The objective of the matched, controlled study was to determine whether low-dose aspirin therapy without heparin improves pregnancy rates following frozen embryo transfer.

Methods:Thirty-six women who did not achieve a pregnancy following fresh embryo transfer and who had frozen embryos available for another transfer were included. Eighteen women were treated with 81 mg aspirin from day 2 of the cycle through pregnancy testing. If the β-human chorionic gonadotropin level was positive, aspirin was continued through the pregnancy. Eighteen women were not given aspirin. The mean outcome variables were pregnancy and implantation rates.

Results: The clinical pregnancy rate in the aspirin group was 11.1%, compared with 33.3% for the controls, and implantation rates were 2.9 and 10.9%, respectively.

Conclusions: No positive effects of low-dose aspirin therapy on pregnancy rates following frozen embryo transfer were observed.

aspirin endometrial architecture frozen embryos pregnancy transvaginal sonography 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome H. Check
    • 1
  • Carole Dietterich
    • 1
  • Deborah Lurie
    • 1
  • Ahmad Nazari
    • 1
  • James Chuong
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology & InfertilityThe University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Cooper Hospital/University Medical CenterCamdenNew Jersey

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