Advertisement

Cytotechnology

, Volume 34, Issue 1–2, pp 71–82 | Cite as

Structured modeling of recombinant protein production in batch and fed-batch culture of baculovirus-infected insect cells

  • J. D. Jang
  • C. S. Sanderson
  • L. C. L. Chan
  • J. P. BarfordEmail author
  • S. Reid
Article

Abstract

The infection of insect cells with baculovirus was described in a mathematical model as a part of the structured dynamic model describing whole animal cell metabolism. The model presented here is capable of simulating cell population dynamics, the concentrations of extracellular and intracellularviral components, and the heterologous product titers. The model describes the whole processes of viral infection and theeffect of the infection on the host cell metabolism. Dynamic simulation of the model in batch and fed-batch mode gave goodagreement between model predictions and experimental data. Optimum conditions for insect cell culture and viral infectionin batch and fed-batch culture were studied using the model.

biotechnology dynamic modeling fermentation processes optimization simulation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barford JP, Phillips PJ and Harbour C (1992) Simulation of animal cell metabolism, Cytotechnology 10: 63–74.Google Scholar
  2. Chan LCL (1998) Optimization of recombinant protein production in the baculovirus expression vector system using batch, fed-batch and perfusion culture. Ph.D. Thesis (Chemical Engineering), University of Queensland, Australia.Google Scholar
  3. Fu PC and Barford JP (1994) Methods and strategies available for the process control and optimisation of monoclonal antibody production. Cytotechnology 14: 219–232.Google Scholar
  4. Miller CK (1993) Baculovirus: high level expression in insect cells. Curr Opin Genet Dev 3: 97–101.Google Scholar
  5. O'Reilly DR, Miller LK and Lucklow VA (1992) Baculovirus Expression Vectors: A Laboratory Manual. WH Freeman, New York.Google Scholar
  6. Power JF, Reid S, Radford KM, Greenfield PF and Nielson LK (1994) Modeling and optimization of the baculovirus expression vector system in batch, suspension culture. Biotechnol Bioeng 44: 710–719.Google Scholar
  7. Radford KM, Reid S and Greenfield PF (1997) Substrate limitation in the baculovirus expression vector system. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 32–44.Google Scholar
  8. Sanderson CS, Barford JP and Barton GW (1994) Modeling and optimization of cell cultures. IChemE Symp Series 137.Google Scholar
  9. Sanderson CS (1997) Development and application of a structured model for animal cell metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Sydney, Australia.Google Scholar
  10. Sanderson CS, Barford JP and Barton GW (1999a) A structured, dynamic model for animal cell culture system. Biochem Eng J 3: 203–211.Google Scholar
  11. Sanderson CS, Jang JD, Barford JP and Barton GW (1999b) A structured, dynamic model for animal cell culture systems: Application to murine hybridoma. Biochem Eng J 3: 213–218.Google Scholar
  12. Sanderson CS, Barford JP, Barton GW, Wong TKK and Reid S (1999c) A structured, dynamic model for animal cell culture: Application to baculovirus/insect cell systems. Biochem Eng J 3: 219–229.Google Scholar
  13. Volkman LE, Goldsmith PA and Hess RT (1986) Alternate pathway of entry of buddedAutographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus: Fusion at the plasma membrane. Virology 148: 288–297.Google Scholar
  14. Wong KTK, Nielsen LK, Greenfield PF and Reid S (1994) Relationship between oxygen uptake rate and time of infection of SF9 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. Cytotechnology 15: 157–167.Google Scholar
  15. Wong KTK, Peter CH, Greenfield PF, Reid S and Nielsen LK (1996) Low multiplicity infection of insect cells with a recombinant baculovirus: The cell yield concept. Biotechnol Bioeng 49: 659–666.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. D. Jang
    • 1
  • C. S. Sanderson
    • 1
  • L. C. L. Chan
    • 2
  • J. P. Barford
    • 3
    Email author
  • S. Reid
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe University of SydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe University of QueenslandQueenslandAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Chemical EngineeringThe Hong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong Kong China

Personalised recommendations