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Cytotechnology

, Volume 34, Issue 1–2, pp 165–173 | Cite as

Production of interferon-β in a culture of fibroblast cells on some polymeric films

  • Akon Higuchi
  • Makoto Yoshida
  • Takeshi Ohno
  • Tetsuo Asakura
  • Mariko Hara
Article

Abstract

Normal human skin (NB1-RGB) cells were cultured in the presenceof polyinosinic and polycytidylic acids, diethylaminoethyldextran, cycloheximide and actinomycin D, which induced humaninterferon-β. The simplest induction method, that requiredonly polyinosinic and polycytidylic acids and diethylaminoethyldextran was found to give the highest production ofinterferon-β by the cells. The cell growth and productionof interferon-β were investigated for NB1-RGB cellscultured on silk fibroin, poly(γ-methyl-L-glutamate),poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) and collagen films prepared bythe Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and casting methods. The cell densityof NB1-RGB cells cultured on the LB films was found to be higherthan that on the cast films made of the same polymer. Thisindicates that not only the chemical structure of the polymersused for the preparation of the films but the preparationmethods of the films, i.e., casting and LB methods, are also astrong factor affecting the cell growth. The production ofinterferon-β per unit number of cells was found to behigher on the cast films than that on the LB films made of thesame polymer. This is explained by the fact that the optimalsuppressed growth of NB1-RGB cells on the cast films leads tothe enhanced production of interferon-β on the cast filmscompared to those on the LB films prepared by the same polymer.

cell culture enhanced production fibroblast cells interferon-β Langmuir-Blodgett film 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akon Higuchi
    • 1
  • Makoto Yoshida
    • 1
  • Takeshi Ohno
    • 1
  • Tetsuo Asakura
    • 2
  • Mariko Hara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial ChemistrySeikei UniversityMusashinoJapan
  2. 2.Department of BiotechnologyTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyKoganeiJapan

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