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Pharmacy World and Science

, Volume 19, Issue 4, pp 159–175 | Cite as

Clinical pharmacology of HIV protease inhibitors: focus on saquinavir, indinavir, and ritonavir

  • R.M.W. Hoetelmans
  • C.H.W. Koks
  • J.H. Beijnen
  • P.L. Meenhorst
  • J.W. Mulder
  • D.M. Burger
Article

Abstract

In this review the clinical pharmacology of HIV protease inhibitors, a new class of antiretroviral drugs, is discussed. After considering HIV protease function and structure, the development of inhibitors of HIV protease is presented. Three protease inhibitors are reviewed in more detail: saquinavir, indinavir, and ritonavir. Clinical trial results with these agents are evaluated. Furthermore, adverse effects, resistance, dosage and administration, clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships, and drug interactions are discussed.

Clinical pharmacology HIV infection Indinavir Protease inhibitor Ritonavir Saquinavir 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • R.M.W. Hoetelmans
    • 1
  • C.H.W. Koks
    • 1
  • J.H. Beijnen
    • 1
  • P.L. Meenhorst
    • 1
  • J.W. Mulder
    • 1
  • D.M. Burger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy & PharmacologySlotervaart HospitalAmsterdamthe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Clinical PharmacyUniversity Hospital NijmegenNijmegenthe Netherlands

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