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Incorporation of lyophilized leaves and pods into artificial diets to assess the antibiosis component of resistance to pod borer Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in chickpea

  • V. Lakshmi Narayanamma
  • H. C. SharmaEmail author
  • C. L. L. Gowda
  • M. Sriramulu
Article

Abstract

Host-plant resistance is one of the major components of integrated pest management programmes against the noctuid pod borer Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) in chickpea. Survival and development of H. armigera on nine chickpea genotypes were compared using two food substrates, namely fresh leaves and pods, and artificial diets containing lyophilized leaf or pod powder of the same genotypes. Among the genotypes used, six showed different levels of resistance to H. armigera, while three were used as susceptible checks. Using leaves and pods, five of the resistant genotypes yielded lower larval weights compared to one of the susceptible checks used. Significant differences between four of the resistant and two of the susceptible genotypes were also observed when using artificial diets containing leaf or pod powder, but the rankings were different from that on the fresh leaves and pods. On both substrates, four resistant genotypes resulted in lower larval survival, pupation, adult emergence and fecundity when compared to one of the susceptible checks. A similar trend was also observed for larval survival and development when using F0i hybrids based on four of the resistant genotypes. Survival and development of H. armigera on the two food substrates, fresh leaves and pods and artificial diets with lyophilized leaf or pod powder, were highly correlated, suggesting that incorporation of lyophilized leaves or pods into the artificial diet can be used to assess antibiosis to H. armigera in chickpea.

Key words

Helicoverpa armigera chickpea biology resistance artificial diet 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Lakshmi Narayanamma
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. C. Sharma
    • 1
    Email author
  • C. L. L. Gowda
    • 1
  • M. Sriramulu
    • 2
  1. 1.International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid TropicsPatancheruIndia
  2. 2.Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural UniversityHyderabadIndia

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