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The Rearing and Production of Cnephasia Jactatana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Using the “Insect Rearing Management System”

  • J. P. R. Ochieng-Odero
  • Pritam Singh
Research Article

Abstract

The Insect Rearing Management (IRM) system was used to rear the black lyre leafroller, Cnephasia jactatana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). The results obtained include life cycle development at various temperatures, application of “day-degrees” in manipulating the life cycle, and use of low temperature for storage of life stages. IRM is a valuable system for regulating production of different life stages as it produces insects of specified quality as required. IRM can be adapted for rearing facilities which handle multiple-species rearing.

Key Words

Cnephasia jactatana black lyre leafroller insect rearing management life cycle production rearing review temperature storage 

Résumé

Le système de gestion d’élevage d’insectes a ete utilise pour l’élevage de l’enrouleuse de la lyre, noire Cnephasia jactatana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Les résultats obtenus concernet le cycle de developpement a differentes temperatures, l’utilisation de degres-jours pour modifier le cycle de developpement, et l’emploi de basses temperatures pour le stockage d’insectes. Le systeme de gestion d’elevage d’insectes est un systeme de gestion approprie pour reguler la production de differents stades larvaires et pour obtenir des insectes d’une qualite specifique. Il peut etre egalement adopte pour l’elevage des especes multiples.

Mots Clés

Cnephasia jactatana enrouleur de lyre noire gestion d’elevage d’insectes cycle de developpement production elevage revue temperature stockage 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. R. Ochieng-Odero
    • 1
  • Pritam Singh
    • 2
  1. 1.International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)NairobiKenya
  2. 2.Plant Protection, Department of Scientific and Industrial ResearchAucklandNew Zealand

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