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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 723–740 | Cite as

Research on Ticks of Livestock in Africa: Review of the Trends, Advances and Milestones in Tick Biology and Ecology in the Decade 1980–1989

  • Olusegun O. Dipeolu
Review A Ten Year Perspective of Insect Science 1980–1989

Abstract

A comprehensive review of the major investigations on the biology and ecology of ticks of Africa reported in scientific journals in the decade 1980–1989 is undertaken. While there have been remarkable advances within the decade on research on feeding habits and patterns of ticks as well as diurnal and seasonal activities, many important areas of research were neglected. These include tick embryogenesis, development and survival under natural conditions, tick modelling, the phenomenon of host’s natural resistance to tick infestation, pheromone and biochemical studies and field sampling of ticks. The review also shows that laboratory studies on tick biological systems are scanty in East Africa and the need for greater tick ecological research in West Africa is stressed.

The review shows that in the decade 1980–1989, exotic Bos taurus breeds were predominantly used for experimentation on African ticks and the need to change focus to indigenous B. indicus cattle breeds for experimentation is highlighted. Attention is also drawn to the importance of researchers on African ticks to undertake long term sustainable research with clearly defined goals which can have quantifiable impact on tick control in Africa.

Key Words

Livestock ticks Africa engorgement weight oviposition embryogenesis seasonal activity diurnal activity tick development tick survival natural resistance pheromones 

Résumé

Cette publication sur la biologie et l’ecologie des tiques en Afrique est basée sur les articles apparuent dans les journaux scientifiques entre 1980 et 1989. Bien que des progres importants furent faits concernant l’alimentation. Les activités saisonières et journalières pendant cette decade, il y a bien des sujets sur les tiques en afrique tels que; l’embryogenese, le developpement et la survie sous les conditions naturelles, les modeles mathematiques, la resistance naturelle de l’animal hôte, les analyses biochimiques et celles des pheromones ainsi que la collection des tiques sur le terrain qui ont ete neglige. Cette publication demontre que les etudes faites au laboratoire sur la biologie des tiques en Afrique de l’Est ne sont pas suffisantes et qu’un besoin urgent sur la recherche ecologique en Afrique de l’Ouest se fait sentir. Il a èté demontre pendant cette decade que pour les experiences faites sur les tiques africains l’animal hote fut presque toujours Bos taurus pour cela l’ idée d’utiliser Bos indicus a èté avancée. L’attention des chercheurs fut attiree sur les tiques de l’Afrique afin de faire des etudes bien definies pour obtenir un contrôle des tiques.

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olusegun O. Dipeolu
    • 1
  1. 1.The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)NairobiKenya

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