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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 355–361 | Cite as

A New Invasive Fruit Fly Species from the Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) Group Detected in East Africa

  • Slawomir A. LuxEmail author
  • Robert S. Copeland
  • Ian M. White
  • Aruna Manrakhan
  • Maxwell K. Billah
Short Communication

Abstract

—A new fruit fly species suspected to be from the Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) group (originating from Asia), was detected during routine field surveys in the Coast Province of Kenya. Since most species in this group are of tremendous quarantine concern when introduced, and considering the fact that it has never before been detected or reported in continental Africa, surveys were immediately initiated covering a distance of over 3000 km across major fruit-growing and trading localities within Kenya, to determine the extent of spread of the new invasive species. We report on the detection of the flies, preliminary results of the survey, and discuss the potential effects of these flies on the horticulture industry in East Africa.

Key Words

fruit flies Bactrocera dorsalis quarantine invasive species 

Résumé

—Une nouvelle mouche des fruits appartenant vraisemblablement au groupe Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (originaire dTnde), a été trouvée lors d’enquêtes de terrain de routine dans la province côtière du Kenya. Depuis que la plupart des espèces de ce groupe font l’objet de mesure de quarantaine très sévère lors de leur introduction et considérant qu’elle n’a jamais été trouvée ou signalée sur le continent Africain auparavant, une enquête couvrant près de 3000 km à travers les principales localités productrices de fruits du Kenya a immédiatement été lancée afin de déterminer l’aire d’extension de cette nouvelle espèce invasive. Nous présentons des résultats sur la découverte de la mouche ainsi que sur l’enquête, et discutons des effets potentiels de cette mouche sur l’industrie horticole de l’Afrique de l’Est.

Mots Clés

mouche des fruits Bactrocera dorsalis quarantaine espèce invasive 

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References

  1. Allwood A.J., Vueti E. T., Leblanc L. and Bull R. (2002) Eradication of introduced Bactrocera species (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Nauru using male annihilation and protein bait application techniques, pp. 19–25. In Turning the Tide: The Eradication of Invasive Species (Edited by C. R. Veitch and M. N. Clout). IUCN Species Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© ICIPE 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Slawomir A. Lux
    • 1
    Email author
  • Robert S. Copeland
    • 1
  • Ian M. White
    • 2
  • Aruna Manrakhan
    • 1
  • Maxwell K. Billah
    • 1
  1. 1.International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)NairobiKenya
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyThe Natural History MuseumLondonUK

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