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Government Influence on Pesticide use in Developing Countries

  • Dale G. Bottrell
Article

Abstract

Chemical pesticide technology has spread much more quickly in the developing world than has the capability to ensure its effective and safe use. Use of pesticides in developing countries is rapidly increasing, and pesticide exporters from the industrialized nations are increasing their sales to the developing countries. Many pesticides considered too dangerous for unrestricted use in the western nations are being exported from these nations to the developing world. Yet under current law it is perfectly legal for companies to export them. Some developing countries have not enacted legislation to govern the importation, domestic use and disposal of these or other pesticide materials. Even with the laws, the governments frequently lack the infrastructures required to enforce them. Further, the developing countries seldom have the medical personnel and facilities required for diagnosing and treating cases of pesticide poisoning, and programmes to train farmers on the correct use of pesticides and alternative methods are often inadequate.

This paper discusses ways that governments at national and international levels influence the spread and use of pesticides in the developing countries through legal action, policies on export and import, aid, research and extension, pest control programmes, and other means.

Key Words

Pesticides governments developing countries pesticide exports pesticide laws pesticide imports integrated pest management 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale G. Bottrell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, Berkeley, Consortium for International Crop ProtectionBerkeleyUSA

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