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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 679–683 | Cite as

Constituents of Commiphora Rostrata and Some of Their Analogues as Maize Weevil, Sitophilus Zeamais Repellents

  • W. Lwande
  • A. Hassanali
  • P. G. Mcdowell
  • L. Moreka
  • S. K. Nokoe
  • P. G. Waterman
Research Article

Abstract

The major alkanone constituents of the resin of Commiphora rostrata, 2-decanone and 2-undecanone, and a series of structural analogues were bioassayed for their repellency against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais in olfactometric assays. All the aliphatic ketones and aldehydes showed comparable or greater activity than the synthetic commercial insect repellent N, N-diethyl toluamide (DEET). In the 2-alkanone series the C-8 and C-9 compounds demonstrated significantly higher activity than their shorter- and longer-chained congeners. Analogues differing in the relative positions of the carbonyl group, including aldehydes, showed a variable pattern of repellency. Alkanols appeared to be mildly attractive to the weevil. The results support our previous suggestion that the resin constituents may play an allomonal role in the ecosystem where the plant thrives.

Key Words

Commiphora rostrata maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais insect repellents ketones aldehydes alkanones 2-alkanones 2-decanone 2-undecanone 2-dodecanone N, N-diethyltoluamide DEET 

Résumé

Les principaux constituents de la resin de Commiphora rostrata, 2-decanone et 2-undecanone, et une toute une serie des structures analogues furent essayé pour leur effet repellant contre Sitophilus zeamais. Tous les cetones aliphatiques et les aldehydes ont montré une activité plus importante que le repellant commercial N, N-diethyl toluamide (DEET). Dans les series du 2-alcanone, les substances C-8 et C-9 ont montré une activité significative par rapport aux chaînes congenères courtes et longues. Les analogues qui différent par la position relative de leur groupe carboxyl, y compris les aldehydes ont montré une image variable de repellance. Les alcohols apparaisent être attractive pour Sitophilus zeamais. Ces resultats supportent notre suggestion concernant les constituents de la resin qui peuvent jouer un rôle allomale sur l’ecosystèmes des plantes.

Mots Clés

Commiphora rostrata Sitophilus zeamais repellants des insectes cetones aldehydes alcanoncs 2-alcanoncs 2-decanone 2-undecanone 2-dodecanone N, N-diethyltoluamide DEET 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Lwande
    • 1
  • A. Hassanali
    • 1
  • P. G. Mcdowell
    • 2
  • L. Moreka
    • 1
  • S. K. Nokoe
    • 1
  • P. G. Waterman
    • 3
  1. 1.The International Centre of Insect Physiology and EcologyNairobiKenya
  2. 2.BP Research InternationalMiddlesexUK
  3. 3.Phytochemistry Research Laboratory, Department of PharmacyUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgow, ScotlandUK

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