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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 5, Issue 6, pp 505–508 | Cite as

The Enhanced Suitability of Hybrid Goats over the Indigenous East African Goat as Hosts for Rearing Glossina Morsitans Morsitans Westwood

  • Peter V. Warner
  • David Mung’ong’o
  • Omari S. Chalo
  • Harald H. Baumgartner
  • Darrell L. Williamson
Research Article

Abstract

The suitability of the East African goat and various types of hybrid goats to serve as hosts for tsetse was compared over an extended period. Although there was no significant difference between indigenous and hybrid goats when feeding up to 350 flies per host, about 94% more indigenous goats than hybrid goats became unsuitable as hosts and required a prolonged period of rest when the fly burden was increased to 450 flies per host. Of the hybrid types assessed, Toggenburg crosses were best suited as hosts even though they required more frequent rest periods than the other hybrid types.

Key Words

East African indigenous goat hybrid goat rearing tsetse hosts for feeding Glossina morsitans host suitability test fly-feeding burden 

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References

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter V. Warner
    • 1
  • David Mung’ong’o
    • 2
  • Omari S. Chalo
    • 2
  • Harald H. Baumgartner
    • 3
  • Darrell L. Williamson
    • 4
  1. 1.OakdaleUSA
  2. 2.Tsetse Research InstituteMinistry of Livestock DevelopmentTangaTanzania
  3. 3.International Atomic Energy AgencyViennaAustria
  4. 4.Agricultural Research Service, USDAHonoluluUSA

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