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A New 6a-Hydroxypterocarpan with Insect Antifeedant and Antifungal Properties from the Roots of Tephrosia Hildebrandtii Vatke

  • W. Lwande
  • A. Hassanali
  • P. W. Njoroge
  • M. D. Bentley
  • F. Delle Monache
  • J. I. Jondiko
Research Article

Abstract

A new 6a-hydroxylated pterocarpan, named hildecarpin, has been isolated from the healthy roots of Tephrosia hildebrandtii. It has been assigned the structure (—)-3,6a-dihydroxy-2-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxypterocarpan on the basis of its spectroscopic data, optical rotation and chemical transformations. Hildecarpin has exhibited insect antifeedant activity against the legume pod-borer Maruca testulalis, an important pest of the cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), and antifungal activity against Cladosporium cucumerinum. This finding suggests that the pterocarpan phytoalexins formed as a result of microbial infection of the cowpea plant may constitute a basis for induced resistance in the plant against M. testulalis.

Key Words

Tephrosia hildebrandtii Leguminosae pterocarpan hildecarpin flavonoid isoflavonoid antifeedant antifungal Maruca testulalis cowpea Vigna unguiculata Vigna species roots 

Résumé

Un nouveau 6a-hydroxylpterocarpan nommé hildecarpin, a été isolé des racines du Tephrosia hildebrandtii. On lui a donné la structure (—)-3,6a-dihydroxy-2-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxypterocarpan en se basant sur ses valeurs spectroscopiques, sa rotation optique, et ses transformations chimiques. Hildecarpin a montre une activité antiparasitaire contre le rongeur de gousse de legume Maruca testulalis un important insecte nuisible au petit pois (cowpea) Vigna unguiculata, et une activité antimycosique contre Cladosporium cocumerinum. Cette découverte suggère que les phytoalexins du pterocarpan formés à la suite d’une infection microbienne de la plante de petit pois (cowpea) pourrait constituer une base de resistance induite dans la plante contre M. testulalis.

Mots Clefs

Tephrosia hildebrandtii Leguminosae pterocarpan hildecarpan flavonoid isoflavonoid antiparasitaire antimycosique Maruca testulalis cowpea Vigna unguiculata Vigna raciness 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Lwande
    • 1
  • A. Hassanali
    • 1
  • P. W. Njoroge
    • 1
  • M. D. Bentley
    • 1
  • F. Delle Monache
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. I. Jondiko
    • 1
  1. 1.The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)NairobiKenya
  2. 2.Istituto di ChimicaUniversita CattolicaRomeItaly

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