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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 6, Issue 6, pp 657–660 | Cite as

Consumption and Digestion of Four Cultivars of Solanum melongena by Selepa docilis Larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

  • Yeboa A. Duodu
  • Ruth C. Addo-Ashong
Article

Abstract

The consumption and digestion of two Ghanaian eggplant cultivars (Asesewa and Odwanhwoa) and two exotic cultivars (Black Beauty and Florida Market) by larval Selepa docilis were studied in the laboratory. Daily food consumption was highest on Asesewa and lowest on Florida Market. Total food consumption was significantly highest on Asesewa, followed by Odwanhwoa, Black Beauty and Florida Market. The dry weight of food consumed per unit of larval fresh weight per day was highest on Asesewa, followed by Odwanhwoa, Florida Market and Black Beauty. In general, food consumption was higher on the Ghanaian than on the exotic cultivars. The efficiency of food digestion was significantly higher on the Ghanaian than on the exotic cultivars. Growth of S. docilis larvae, recorded by the daily larval fresh weights, was highest on Asesewa, followed by Odwanhwoa, Black Beauty and Florida Market. The conclusion is made that S. docilis is best adapted to Asesewa, then Odwanhwoa, Black Beauty and Florida Market. Furthermore, S. docilis is better adapted to the Ghanaian than to the exotic cultivars.

Key Words

Selepa docilis Solanum melongena eggplant food consumption digestion growth 

Résumé

La consommation et la digestion de deux cultivars aubergines indigènes ghanéenes (Asesewa et Odwanhwoa) aussi que des deux cultivars exotiques [Black Beauty et Florida Market) par les larvae de Selepa docilis ont été étudiées au laboratoire.

La consommation quotidienne était la plus élevée pour Asesewa et la plus basse pour Florida Market. La consommation totale de l’aliment était la plus élevée significativement pour Asesewa suivis par Odwanhwoa, Black Beauty et Florida Market.

Le poid sec d’aliment consomée par unité de frais poid larval par jour était aussi la plus élevée pour Asesewa suivis par Odwanhwoa, Florida Market et Black Beauty. En ce qui concerne les cultivars on peut dire d’une manière general que la consommation d’aliment était plus élevée pour l’indigène que la plante exotique. L’efficacité de la digestion d’aliment était plus élevée significativement pour l’indigène que la plante exotique.

Le développement de la larve de S. docilis enregistré quotidiennement sur le poid frais larval était le plus élevée pour Asesewa suivis par Odwanhwoa, Black Beauty et Florida Market.

On tire la conclusion que S. docilis est mieux adapté à Asesewa, puis Odwanhwoa, Black Beauty et Florida Market. A propos de cultivars S. docilis est en outre mieux adapté à l’indigène que la plante exotique.

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeboa A. Duodu
    • 1
  • Ruth C. Addo-Ashong
    • 2
  1. 1.Commonwealth Institute of Biological Control, West African Substationc/o Crops Research InstituteKumasiGhana
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of Science and TechnologyKumasiGhana

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