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International Journal of Tropical Insect Science

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 393–395 | Cite as

9-Acridone Insect Antifeedant Alkaloids from Teclea Trichocarpa Bark

  • W. Lwande
  • T. Gebreyesus
  • A. Chapya
  • C. Macfoy
  • A. Hassanali
  • M. Okech
Article

Abstract

—Three 9-acridone alkaloids, melicopicine, tecleanthine and 6-methoxy tecleanthine were isolated from the bark of Teclea trichocarpa. Melicopicine and tecleanthine exhibited mild antifeedant activity against the African armyworm, Spodoptera exempta. All the three alkaloids showed antimicrobial activity against the fungus, Cladosporium cucumerinum and the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis.

Key Words

Teclea trichocarpa Rutaceae melicopicine tecleanthine 6-methoxy tecleanthine 9-acridone alkaloids antifeedant antifungal antibacterial 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Lwande
    • 1
  • T. Gebreyesus
    • 1
  • A. Chapya
    • 1
  • C. Macfoy
    • 1
  • A. Hassanali
    • 1
  • M. Okech
    • 1
  1. 1.The International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE)NairobiKenya

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