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The Biology and Control of the Sorghum Shootfly, Atherigona Soccata Rondani, in Thailand

  • B. Meksongsee
  • M. Chawanapong
  • U. Sangkasuwan
  • P. Poonyathaworn
Article

Abstract

The biology of the sorghum shootfly, Atherigona soccata Rondani, was studied at the Corn and Sorghum Research Centre, Thailand. The preoviposition period is 3–5 days long. The females deposited a mean of 238 eggs with an average incubation period of 3 days. The larval development required an average of 7.8 days, and the pupal stage was 7.1 days long. The adults were reared with ordinary sugar, yeast and water. The females lived an average of 30 days and the males 20 days.

Carbofuran granular formulation is still the leading product for the control of the shootfly at the Research Centre. The application rate in the seed furrow is 0.45-0.60 kg a.i./ha with a row spacing of 75 cm. Furadan® 30ST, an emulsifiable formation of carbofuran, can also be used as a seed dressing at a rate of 20 cm3/kg of seeds. Counter®, another soil systematic insecticide, has been found effective in controlling the sorghum shootfly.

A modification of the ICRISAT trap for the sorghum shootfly is described. The trap may be effective in reducing the fly population.

Key Words

Life history seasonal incidence chemical control carbofuran Counter® terbofos shootfly trap 

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References

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Meksongsee
    • 1
  • M. Chawanapong
    • 1
  • U. Sangkasuwan
    • 1
  • P. Poonyathaworn
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Entomology and Zoology, Department of AgricultureThailand

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