Advertisement

Variation in the Haemocyte Population During Different Hours of Day and Night in an Insect, Alphitobius Piceus Oliver

  • A. Islam
  • S. Roy
Article

Abstract

—Both free and sessile haemocyte counts in Alphitobius piceus showed wide variations between 06.00 and 22.00 hr. Variations in the haemogram appeared to be related to sex related cycles of activity, presumably with special reference to feeding patterns. Males showed higher total haemocyte counts during the day in comparison to females. In both sexes, the percentage of prohaemocytes and spherule cells and only in males, plasmatocytes increased during the early hours of night. In females, the percentage of granular haemocytes decreased notably between 18.00 and 20.00 hr. Number of adipohaemocytes and oenocytoids did not vary significantly. Heat treatment caused release of sessile haemocytes into the circulation resulting in a notable increase in total haemocyte counts during the day. This increase was comparatively high in females in comparison with males. Altered photoperiod had little effect on these haemocyte variations. Blood volume was slightly higher in the night than in the day in both sexes. The variation of blood volume was insignificant under both heat treatment and altered photoperiod conditions.

Key Words

Haemocytes photoperiod thermal shock Alphitobius sp 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arnold J. W. (1969) Periodicity in the proportion of the haemocyte categories in the giant cockroach Blaberus giganteus. Can Ent. 101, 68–777.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Arnold J. W. (1970) Haemocytes of the pacific beetle cockroach Diploptera punctata. Can. Ent. 102, 830–835.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Arnold J. W. (1974) The haemocytes of Insecta. In The Physiology of Insecta (Edited by Rockstein M.) Vol. V., 2nd edn., pp. 201–254. Academic Press, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Arnold J. W. and Hinks C. F. (1979) Insect hemocytes under light microscopy: techniques. In Insect Hemocytes, Development, Forms, Functions and Techniques (Edited by Gupta A. P.), pp. 531–538. Cambridge University Press, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Arumugum M. and Ravindranath M. H. (1980) Significance of the variation in haemolymph copper-protein ratio in the crab Scylla serrata (Forskal) during different hours of the day. Experientia 36, 1306–1307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Brady J. (1974) The physiology of insect circardian rhythm. Adv. Insect Physiol. 10, 1–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Crossley A. C. (1975) The cytophysiology of insect blood. Adv. Insect Physiol. 11, 117–221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Feir D. (1979) Cellular and humoral responses to toxic substances. In Insect Hemocytes, Development, Forms, Functions and Techniques (Edited by Gupta A. P.), pp. 415–421. Cambridge University Press, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Feir D. and McClain E. (1968) Mitotic activity of the circulating hemocytes of the large milk weed bug, Onco-peltus fasciatus. Ann. ent. Soc. Am. 61, 413–416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Harker J. E. (1964) The Physiology of Diurnal Rythym. Cambridge University Press, London.Google Scholar
  11. Hoffmann J. A., Zachar Y. D., Hoffmann D. and Brehelin M. (1979) Post-embryonic development and differentiation: hemopoetic tissues and their functions in some insects. In Insect Hemocytes, Development, Forms, Functions and Techniques (Edited by Gupta A. P.), pp. 29–66. Cambridge University Press, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Islam A. and Roy S. (1982) Diurnal rhythm of hemocyte populations in an insect Schizodactylus monstrosus Drury. Experientia 38, 567–568.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Islam A. and Roy S. (1983) Studies on some aspects of haemocytes in Alphitobius piceus Olv. (Insecta, Cole-optera, Tenebrionidae). Proc. Indian Natn. Sci. Acad. B49 (in press).Google Scholar
  14. Jones J. C. (1962) Current concepts concerning insect hemocytes. Am. Zool. 2, 209–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Jones J. C. (1964) The circulatory systems of insects. In The Physiology of Insecta (Edited by Rockstein M.), Vol. 3, 1st edn., pp. 1–107. Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  16. Kannan K. and Ravindranath M. H. (1980) Changes in protein-calcium association during different hours of day in the haemolymph of the crab Scylla serrata (Forskal). Experientia 36, 965–966.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Lee R. M. (1961) The variation of blood volume with age in desert locus (Schistocerca gregaria Forskal). J. Insect Physiol. 6, 36–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Ravindranath M. H. (1977) The circulating haemocyte population of the mole crab Emertia ( = Hippa) asiatica Milne Edward. Biol. Bull. 152, 415–423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Ravindranath M. H. (1978) The individualtiy of plas-matocytes and granular haemocytes of arthropods—a review. Dev. Comp. Immun. 2, 581–594.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Shapiro M. (1979a) Changes in hemocyte population. In Insect Hemocytes, Development, Forms, Functions and Techniques (Edited by Gupta A. P.), pp. 475–523. Cambridge University Press, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Shapiro M. (1979b) Techniques for total and differential hemocyte counts and blood volume and mitotic index determinations. In Insect Hemocytes, Development, Forms, Functions and Techniques (Edited by Gupta A. P.), pp. 539–548. Cambridge University Press, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Wigglesworth V. B. (1959) Insect blood cells. A. Rev. Ent. 4, 1–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© ICIPE 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Islam
    • 1
  • S. Roy
    • 1
  1. 1.Entomology Laboratory, Department of ZoologyUniversity of BurdwanBurdwan-India

Personalised recommendations