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Metabolic Rates in Different Castes and Instars of a Drywood Termite Bifiditermes Beesoni (Gardner) (Isoptera)

  • Mohammad Afzal
Article

Abstract

—A comparison of the metabolic rates of different castes and instars was estimated by measuring the biological half-life of the radioisotope I131. The metabolism in the soldier caste was not only higher than alates and dealates, but also pre-soldiers. The rate of metabolism increased with an increase in the age of the nymphs. The termites which were provided with food had slow metabolism compared to those kept under starvation. The studies are helpful in understanding the phenomenon of ‘temporal polyethism’ among termites.

Key Words

Metabolic rates castes and instars radioisotope biological half-life polyethism 

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Copyright information

© ICIPE 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammad Afzal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of PunjabLahorePakistan

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