Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur

, Volume 56, Issue 1, pp 23–24 | Cite as

Five-year follow-up study of a kidney-tonifying herbal Fufang for prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and fragility fractures

Journal Club

Abstract

To observe the kidney-tonifying herbal Fufangs with phytoestrogenic epimedium for prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis with both bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture as study endpoints, a 5-year multicenter follow-up study in 194 postmenopausal women (47–70 years old) was conducted in which the subjects were given oral administration of herbal Fufang (10 g/day, twice per day, n = 101) or placebo (n = 93). Both groups were supplemented daily with calcium (600 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). BMD at distal radius, potential adverse events, and fracture incidence were evaluated at baseline and at 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. At the end of 5 years, 155 subjects had completed the study, with better adherence in the treatment group (13 % dropouts, n = 88 at year 5) as compared with the control group (28 % dropouts, n = 67 at year 5) (P < 0.05). No notable adverse events were observed in either group. In the treatment group BMD increased significantly from baseline (0.211 ± 0.022 g cm2) to the end of the study (0.284 ± 0.015 g/cm2), whereas the control group decreased significantly from baseline (0.212 ± 0.023 g/cm2) to 5 years later (0.187 ± 0.022 g/cm2) (P < 0.05).

The fracture incidence was 2.4 fold lower in the treatment group than in the control group, with a relative risk of 0.57 for the treatment group (95 % CI, 0.43–0.70, P < 0.05). In conclusion, in addition to the beneficial effects of oral herbal Fufang on prevention of postmenopausal bone loss, this 5-year multi-center clinical study demonstrated for the first time its potential for reduction in fragility fracture incidence.

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Copyright information

© Springer Medizin Verlag GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. M. Deng
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Huang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Axel Wiebrecht
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of RehabilitationGeneral Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of PLAGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.Center for Translational Medicine Research and Development, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced TechnologyChinese Academy of SciencesShenzhen, GuangdongChina
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedics & TraumatologyThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongHong Kong
  4. 4.BerlinDeutschland

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