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Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur

, Volume 51, Issue 2, pp 45–46 | Cite as

Acupuncture for Persistent Allergic Rhinitis: a Randomised, Sham-Controlled Trial

  • Charlie C. L. Xue
  • Xuedong An
  • Thomas P. Cheung
  • Cliff Da Costa
  • George B. Lenon
  • Frank C. Thien
  • David F. Story
  • Benno Brinkhaus
Journal Club

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR).

Design

Randomised, single-blind, sham-controlled trial conducted from May 2004 to February 2005.

Participants and intervention

80 patients with PAR (age, 16–70 years) were randomly assigned to receive real or sham acupuncture. After a 1-week baseline period, participants were tre ated twice weekly for 8 weeks and followed up for another 12 weeks.

Main outcome measures

Nasal obstruction, sneezing, rhinorrhoea and nasal itch were each self-assessed daily on a 5-point scale, and scores were aggregated weekly. The sum of the symptom scores (total nasal symptom score, TNSS) was also determined. A secondary outcome was use of PAR relief medication.

Results

After 8 weeks’ treatment, the weekly mean difference in TNSS from baseline was greater with real (−17.2; 95 % CI, −24.6 to −9.8) than with sham acupuncture (−4.2; 95 % CI, −11.0 to 2.7) (P = 0.01). The decrease in individual symptom score was also greater with real acupuncture for rhinorrhoea (P < 0.01) but not the other symptoms. At the end of follow-up, the greater difference in TNSS from baseline in the real acupuncture group was still apparent: real, −21.0 (95 % CI, −29.1 to −12.9) versus sham, −2.3 (95 % CI, −10.2 to 5.6) (P = 0.001). Moreover, the differences from baseline in all four individual symptom scores were greater for the real than for the sham group (P < 0.05). Real and sham acupuncture were both well tolerated.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that acupuncture is effective in the symptomatic treatment of PAR.

Literatur

  1. 1.
    Brinkhaus B, Hummelsberger J, Kohnen R et al. Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized-controlled clinical trial. Allergy 2004; 59,9:953–960CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ng DK, Chow PY, Ming SP et al. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of acupuncture for the treatment of childhood persistent allergic rhinitis. Pediatrics 2004;114,5:1242–1247CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Xue CC, An X, Cheung TP et al. Acupuncture for persistent allergic rhinitis: a randomised, sham-controlled trial. Med J Aust. 2007;187,6:337–341PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Xue CC, English R, Zhang JJ et al. Effect of acupuncture in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Am. J. Chin Med. 2002; 30,1:1–11CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Xue CC, Thien FC, Zhang JJ et al. Treatment for seasonal allergic rhinitis by Chinese herbal medicine: a randomized placebo controlled trial. Altern. Ther. Health Med. 2003;9,5:80–87PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Medizin Verlag GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlie C. L. Xue
    • 1
  • Xuedong An
    • 1
  • Thomas P. Cheung
    • 1
  • Cliff Da Costa
    • 2
  • George B. Lenon
    • 1
  • Frank C. Thien
    • 3
  • David F. Story
    • 4
  • Benno Brinkhaus
  1. 1.Division of Chinese Medicine, School of Health Sciences, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Traditional MedicineRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.School of Mathematical and Geospatial SciencesRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory MedicineThe Alfred Hospital and Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.School of Health SciencesRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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