Traditional phytomedicines for gynecological problems used by tribal communities of Mohmand Agency near the Pak-Afghan border area

Abstract

Medicinal plants play a vital role in the human health care system of tribal communities and in the treatment of various gynecological problems. This study is an effort to document important medicinal flora used for the treatment of gynecological problems by indigenous people living in a tribal region near the Pak-Afghan border. The main objective of the study was to establish a clear profile of indigenous knowledge and practices from the unexplored tribal territory. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and group discussions. The data were analyzed through Use Value and Factor of Informant Consensus. A total of 52 medicinal plants were recorded from the area; the most widely accepted were Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (94 Use Value), Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (93 Use Value), Prunus domestica L. (91 Use Value), Myrtus communis L. (91 Use Value), Cannabis sativa L. (91 Use Value) and Nigella sativa L. (90 Use Value). A high consensus factor was recorded for menses-related problems (0.95). The root was the main part used (23% plants), followed by the leaves (20% plants), whole plant (18% plants), fruit (18% plants), and seed (13% plants). A total of 21 plants were used to treat menses-related problems, followed by sexual problems (ten plants), leucorrhea (nine plants), gastric problems (seven plants) and amenorrhea (seven plants). Knowledge related to ethnogynecological treatments is restricted to midwives and traditional healers. In conclusion, the documented flora that is particularly important to medicinal plants may be researched in the future to discover new pharmaceutical, neutraceutical and other pharmacological agents against gynecological complaints.

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AHK and HU collected the data. MAA and AHK wrote the draft manuscript. HU helped in the compilation of data. During revision stages, AH and EFAA contributed significantly and MA and MAA supervised all stages of this research study. MA gave technical comments on the draft manuscript and indicated grammatical and language mistakes. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Aziz, M.A., Khan, A.H., Ullah, H. et al. Traditional phytomedicines for gynecological problems used by tribal communities of Mohmand Agency near the Pak-Afghan border area. Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 28, 503–511 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2018.05.003

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Keywords

  • Ethnomedicines
  • Menstrual problems
  • Use value
  • Factor of Informant Consensus
  • Pharmaceuticals