Validated high performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of stability of madecassoside and asiaticoside in film forming polymeric dispersions

Abstract

The objective of the work was to validate the high performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of stability of madecassoside and asiaticoside in Centella asiatica (L.) Urb., Apiaceae, extract-loaded film forming polymeric dispersions. High performance liquid chromatography method was validated in five topics: linearity and range, limit of detection and limit of quantitation, specificity, precision, and accuracy. Results showed the method had a good linearity (R2 > 0.9990) in the range of 5–150 μg/ml and specific. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation of madecassoside were 81 and 245 ng/ml and asiaticoside were 21 and 64 ng/ml, respectively. The percent relative standard deviation of intraday and interday precision were less than 1 and 3%, respectively. The accuracy presented as percent recovery was 101.54–103.29% for madecassoside and 100.39–102.58% for asiaticoside. This validated high performance liquid chromatography method was used to determine the stability of the formulation containing Centella asiatica extract. Centella asiatica extract-loaded film forming polymeric dispersions used Eudragit® RS 30D and Eudragit® RL 30D as film former, glycerin as plasticizer, and absolute ethanol as solvent and penetration enhancer. Three formulations with different ratio of Eudragit® RS 30D and Eudragit® RL30D were prepared and stored for 90 days at 4°C, 25°C, and 40°C. Stability results showed that almost all of the formulations were unstable at 25°C and 40°C. Except, two of three formulations were stable at 4°C. However, the formulation was further developed to improve the stability of madecassoside and asiaticoside in the formulation.

References

  1. Bylka, W., Znajdek-Awizeń, P., Studzińska-Sroka, E., Dańczak-Pazdrowska, A., Brzezińska, M., 2014. Centella asiatica in dermatology: an overview. Phytother. Res. 28, 1117–1124.

    CAS  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  2. Frederiksen, K., Guy, R.H., Petersson, K., 2015. Formulation considerations in the design of topical, polymeric film-forming systems for sustained drug delivery to the skin. Eur. J. Pharm. Biopharm. 91, 9–15.

    CAS  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  3. Garvie-Cook, H., Frederiksen, K., Petersson, K., Guy, R.H., Gordeev, S.N., 2015. Biophysical elucidation of the mechanism of enhanced drug release and topical delivery from polymeric film-forming systems. J. Control Release 212, 103–112.

    CAS  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  4. Inamdar, P.K., Yeole, R.D., Srivastava, M.M., Souza, N.J.D., 1996. Stability study of the active constituents in the Centella asiatica extract formulations. Drug Dev. Ind. Pharm. 2, 211–216.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Khare, C.P., 2007. Centella asiatica (Linn.) Urban. Indian Medicinal Plants: An Illustrated Dictionary. Springer New York, New York, pp. 1.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Pichayakorn, W., Suksaeree, J., Boonme, P., Amnuaikit, T., Taweepreda, W., Ritthidej, G.C., 2013. Deproteinized natural rubber film forming polymeric solutions for nicotine transdermal delivery. Pharm. Dev.Technol. 18, 1111–1121.

    CAS  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  7. Pichayakorn, W., Suksaeree, J., Boonme, P., Taweepreda, W., Amnuaikit, T., Ritthidej, G.C., 2015. Transdermal nicotine mixed natural rubber-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose film forming systems for smoking cessation: in vitro evaluations. Pharm. Dev. Technol. 20, 966–975.

    CAS  Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  8. Puttarak, P., Brantner, A., Panichayupakaranant, P., 2016. Biological activities and stability of a standardized pentacyclic triterpene enriched Centella asiatica extract. Nat. Prod. Sci. 22, 20–24.

    CAS  Article  Google Scholar 

  9. Zurdo Schroeder, I., Franke, P., Schaefer, U.F., Lehr, C.M., 2007. Delivery of ethinylestradiol from film forming polymeric solutions across human epidermis in vitro and in vivo in pigs. J. Control Release 118, 196–203.

    Article  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Chaowalit Monton or Chitradee Luprasong.

Additional information

Authors’ contributions

CM and CL contributed in all parts of work: running the laboratory work, analysis of the result and drafted the manuscript. JS and TS contributed in analysis of the data. All authors have read and approved the final manuscript.

Rights and permissions

This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Monton, C., Luprasong, C., Suksaeree, J. et al. Validated high performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of stability of madecassoside and asiaticoside in film forming polymeric dispersions. Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 28, 289–293 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2018.04.003

Download citation

Keywords

  • Asiaticoside
  • Film forming polymeric dispersions
  • High performance liquid chromatography
  • Madecassoside