Morpho-anatomy and chemical profile of native species used as substitute of quina (Cinchona spp.) in Brazilian traditional medicine. Part II: Remijia ferruginea

Abstract

This research is part of a larger study of the Brazilian species that are commonly referred to as “quinas” and used as substitute of Cinchona species. In this study, we have performed the botanical characterization of the stem bark of Remijia ferruginea (A. St.-Hil.) DC, Rubiaceae, by morphological and anatomical description, and the analysis of its chemical profile. Stem bark is thin and has the color and the texture of its external and internal surfaces as diagnostic features. Types and sizes of sclerified cells in the cortical parenchyma and in the secondary phloem are important features for analysis of the transversal sections and in the macerate. Alkaloids, flavonoids and chlorogenic acid were detected in the chemical analysis for TLC. These standard references can be used in the quality control of the bark of quinas.

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Correspondence to Nádia S. Somavilla.

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Authors’ contribution

NSS contributed in anatomy and histochemical studies. MGLB is the coordinator of the research and GPC has done the chromatographic analyses. CWF contributed in collecting plant material, identification and herbarium confection. All the authors have read the final manuscript and approved the submission.

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Somavilla, N.S., Cosenza, G.P., Fagg, C.W. et al. Morpho-anatomy and chemical profile of native species used as substitute of quina (Cinchona spp.) in Brazilian traditional medicine. Part II: Remijia ferruginea. Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 27, 153–157 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjp.2016.09.005

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Keywords

  • Stem bark anatomy
  • Quality control
  • Quinine derivatives