Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica

, Volume 29, Issue 6, pp 642–654 | Cite as

Finite Spherical Cavity Expansion Method for Layering Effect

Article

Abstract

A decay function for the layering effect during the projectile penetrating into layered targets is constructed, which is obtained via the theoretical solution of a dynamically expanding layered spherical cavity with finite radius in the layered targets that are assumed to be incompressible Mohr-Coulomb materials. By multiplying the decay function with the semi-empirical forcing functions that account for all the constitutive behavior of the targets, the forcing functions for the layered targets are obtained. Then, the forcing functions are used to represent the targets and are applied on the projectile surface as the pressure boundary condition where the projectile is modeled by an explicit transient dynamic finite element code. This methodology is implemented into ABAQUS explicit solver via the user subroutine VDLOAD, which eliminates the need for discretizing the targets and the need for the complex contact algorithm. In order to verify the proposed layering effect model, depth-of-penetration experiments of the 37 mm hard core projectile penetrating into three sets of fiber concrete and soil layered targets are conducted. The predicted depths of penetration show good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, the influence of layering effect on projectile trajectory during earth penetration is investigated. It is found that the layering effect should be taken into account if the final position and trajectory of the projectile are the main concern.

Key Words

finite spherical cavity expansion layering effect depth of penetration projectile trajectory 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and Technology 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiangzhen Kong
    • 1
  • Qin Fang
    • 1
  • Hao Wu
    • 1
  • Yadong Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory for Disaster Prevention & Mitigation of Explosion & ImpactPLA University of Science & TechnologyNanjingChina

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