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Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica

, Volume 24, Issue 5, pp 461–466 | Cite as

Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Alumina Coatings Plasma-Sprayed at Different Substrate Temperatures

  • Yazhe Xing
  • Chaoping Jiang
  • Hong Chen
  • Jianmin Hao
Article

Abstract

Alumina coatings are prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying through controlling the substrate temperature during spraying. The changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings prepared at different substrate temperatures are examined. The hardness and the elastic modulus of the coatings are measured by indentation methods. The results show that interlamellar bonding in the coatings is significantly improved with increasing the substrate temperature. Moreover, long through-thickness columnar grains form in the coatings when the substrate temperature reaches above 430°C. As a result, the cross-sectional hardness and the elastic modulus perpendicular to the coating surface increase with increasing the substrate temperature.

Key words

plasma spraying alumina interlamellar bonding elastic modulus 

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Copyright information

© The Chinese Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and Technology 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yazhe Xing
    • 1
  • Chaoping Jiang
    • 1
  • Hong Chen
    • 1
  • Jianmin Hao
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Materials Science and EngineeringChang’an UniversityXi’anChina

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