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Mammalian Biology

, Volume 77, Issue 3, pp 224–228 | Cite as

Genetic analyses reveal further cryptic lineages within the Myotis nattereri species complex

  • Sébastien J. PuechmailleEmail author
  • Benjamin Allegrini
  • Emma S. M. Boston
  • Marie-Jo Dubourg-Savage
  • Allowen Evin
  • Alexandre Knochel
  • Yann Le Bris
  • Vincent Lecoq
  • Michèle Lemaire
  • Delphine Rist
  • Emma C. Teeling
Short Communication

Abstract

In recent years, new cryptic mammalian species have been discovered in Europe, many of which belong to the order Chiroptera. Within this order, some species such as Myotis nattereri contain several cryptic lineages/species, especially in the Mediterranean region. Here we present genetic, phylogenetic and morphological analysis on the Myotis nattereri species complex, focusing on France which is thought to be a contact zone for the different lineages/species. We sequenced the full Cytochrome b gene from individuals from 23 localities and investigated diagnostic morphological characteristics. Our results reveal new phylogenetic relationships within the Myotis nattereri species complex and among closely related species. We discuss morphological characters which are synapomorphic to each lineage and can be used to differentiate them. Our results also demonstrate the presence of a new lineage within the Myotis nattereri species complex. This lineage, endemic to Corsica, possibly represents a new cryptic species for which we present preliminary ecological data. We further identify the presence of three lineages/species in France and detail their distribution with potential contact zones.

Keywords

Myotis nattereri Chiroptera Cryptic diversity Phylogeny 

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Copyright information

© Deutsche Gesellschaft für Säugetierkunde 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sébastien J. Puechmaille
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Benjamin Allegrini
    • 4
  • Emma S. M. Boston
    • 1
  • Marie-Jo Dubourg-Savage
    • 3
  • Allowen Evin
    • 5
    • 6
  • Alexandre Knochel
    • 7
  • Yann Le Bris
    • 8
  • Vincent Lecoq
    • 9
  • Michèle Lemaire
    • 10
  • Delphine Rist
    • 8
  • Emma C. Teeling
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biology and Environmental SciencesUniversity College DublinDublinIreland
  2. 2.Sensory Ecology groupMax Planck Institute for OrnithologySeewiesenGermany
  3. 3.Groupe Chiroptères de Midi-Pyrénées (CREN-GCMP)ToulouseFrance
  4. 4.NaturaliaAvignonFrance
  5. 5.Département Systématique et EvolutionOrigine Structure et Evolution de la BiodiversitéParisFrance
  6. 6.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of AberdeenScotlandUK
  7. 7.Conservatoire des Sites LorrainsFénétrangeFrance
  8. 8.Groupe Chiroptères CorseCorteFrance
  9. 9.Association MyotisFrance
  10. 10.Muséum d’Histoire naturelle de la ville de BourgesBourgesFrance

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