Translating Forest School: A response to Leather

Short Communication

Abstract

This paper responds to criticisms of the lack of a theoretical framework for Forest School by demonstrating its social constructivist paradigm and its links to theories of play. It explores the cultural context that has allowed Forest School to flourish in the UK and explains the origins of the leadership qualification studied by practitioners.

Keywords

Forest School Social paradigm Play Learning Leadership 

References

  1. Davies, G. (2017a). A brief review of the function of the Forest School Association. Retrieved from http://www.forestschoolassociation.org/brief-review-function-forest-school-association/
  2. Davies, G. (2017b). Results of survey: Your level 3 Forest School training experience. Retrieved from http://www.forestschoolassociation.org/results-survey-level-3-forest-school-training-experience/
  3. Knight, S. (2016). Forest School in Practice. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  4. Leather, M. (2012). Seeing the wood from the trees: Constructionism and constructivism for outdoor and experiential Education. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316547961_Seeing_the_wood_from_the_trees_constructionism_and_constructivism_for_outdoor_and_experiential_education Google Scholar
  5. Outdoor & Experiential Learning Research Network (n.d.). Good from woods. Retrieved from https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/research/oelres-net/good-from-woods).

Copyright information

© Outdoor Education Australia 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Forest SchoolSudburyUK

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