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Place-based outdoor learning: more than a drag and drop approach

  • Amanda LloydEmail author
  • Son Truong
  • Tonia Gray
Original Paper

Abstract

The Forest School movement offers children valuable outdoor experiences; however, pedagogically it is under-theorised and under-researched in diverse contexts. As a result, it has at times become a “drag and drop” program, which does not necessarily acknowledge local place, environment or culture. Alternatively, place-based outdoor learning is examined as a place-responsive approach, where a year-long outdoor program was implemented and evaluated in an Australian primary school. Place-based outdoor learning is a broader integrated approach that is interconnected with place, curriculum and learners. This paper re-envisions a perspective on outdoor teaching to individualise meaningful learning in nature, within specific contexts.

Keywords

Forest School Place-based Place-responsive Outdoor learning Primary curriculum 

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Copyright information

© Outdoor Education Australia 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Outdoor ConnectionsGerringongAustralia
  2. 2.Western Sydney UniversitySydneyAustralia

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