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Journal of Bionic Engineering

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 567–578 | Cite as

Layout Design of Conductive Heat Channel by Emulating Natural Branch Systems

  • Yidong Ji
  • Xiaohong Ding
  • Hao Li
  • Min Xiong
Article
  • 40 Downloads

Abstract

To design effective and easy-to-manufacture conductive heat channels, a heuristic method by emulating the natural branch systems is suggested. The design process of the method is divided into two steps, which are the principal channel design and the lateral channel design. During the process, the width of each channel is controlled by the bifurcation law, and the end point of the channel is located at the point with the maximum temperature while the start points of the principal channel and the lateral channel are respectively determined by the location of the heat sink and the law of the minimum thermal resistance. Four design examples with different boundary conditions are studied by the suggested method, and the design results are compared with that of the traditional structural topology optimization method. Not only lower maximum temperature and relatively uniform distribution of temperature are obtained by the suggested method, but also straight channels are achieved without gray element, which is easy to manufacture. The suggested method inspired by the natural branch systems can provide an effective solution for heat channel design in the heat dissipation structures.

Keywords

conductive heat channel bionic layout design natural branch system thermal resistance bifurcation law 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the Chinese National Natural Science Fund (Grant No. 51175347). The support is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Jilin University 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical engineeringUniversity of Shanghai for Science and TechnologyShanghaiChina

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