Asian Journal of Civil Engineering

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 295–307 | Cite as

Effects of finite element modeling and analysis techniques on response of steel moment-resisting frame in dynamic column removal scenarios

Original Paper
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Abstract

Due to the high cost of the experimental progressive collapse tests, numerical simulation has been widely used by researchers. Finite element method is applied in the majority of numerical progressive collapse studies. In this paper, the influences of finite element modeling and analysis techniques including solution procedure, mesh size, element type, column removal time (CRT), damping, strain rate and output-related issues on nonlinear dynamic column removal response of a steel framed structure are evaluated in detail. According to the results, mesh size and column removal time have major influence on the structural response in column removal scenarios, while influences of solution procedure and damping ratio on the maximum response are negligible. Considering the strain-rate effects results in lower response and the rate of decline mainly depends on column removal time. Results also show that special emphasis should be laid on the accuracy of saving outputs, because a long interval causes significant change in the estimated response and may lead to misleading conclusions.

Keywords

Progressive collapse Dynamic column removal Nonlinear analysis Mesh dependency Strain rate 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUrmia UniversityUrmiaIran

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