Photobiomodulation with 940 nm laser diode: effect on the interleukin 6 expression after orthodontic initial archwire activation

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the effect of photobiomodulation (PBM) during the initial stage of orthodontic treatment, measuring levels of IL-6 in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and comparing to a control group of teeth.

Materials and methods

Forty-four first premolars were orthodontically treated with passive self-ligation Damon Q (Ormco, Orange, CA, USA) brackets and 0.014 CuNiTi archwires. Sides were randomly assigned to a non-irradiated control group and experimental group (n = 22) treated with 940 nm, 0.1 W, and 2 J for 20s/surface. Gingival crevicular fluid was obtained before treatment and 24 h after; a third sample was obtained immediately after a second laser irradiation. IL-6 concentration was measured by enzymatic immunoassay.

Results

The basal concentration of IL-6 in the control group (3.194 ± 0.71 pg/μl) was higher than in the experimental group (2.923 ± 0.48 pg/μl) and was reduced 24 h after the initial archwire placement. In the experimental group of teeth, 24 h after and after the first laser application, the levels were lower. However, the values obtained following the second laser application, evaluating immediate effect, presented a mild increment. The difference between control and experimental groups after 24 h was significant.

Conclusion

PBM with 940 nm, 0.1 W, 4 J, 21.05 J/cm2, and 40 s per tooth is not able to produce statistically significant changes in the concentration of IL-6 in GCF, immediately or after 24 h of its application, during initial orthodontic treatment with light forces.

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Correspondence to Angela Domínguez.

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Domínguez, A., Payán, X., Dipp, F.A. et al. Photobiomodulation with 940 nm laser diode: effect on the interleukin 6 expression after orthodontic initial archwire activation. Laser Dent Sci (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41547-021-00115-0

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Keywords

  • Crevicular fluid
  • Cytokines
  • Interleukin-6
  • Laser
  • Photobiomodulation
  • Orthodontic movement