You, me, and OHP: Applying the Sociocultural Self Model to OHP Interventions

Abstract

Many OHP interventions depend on some form of active participation from an employee and trends of low participation in interventions could jeopardize validity and impact. Intervention involvement can vary based on demographic, job-related, and health-related factors, with some research finding that those who would benefit the most from an intervention may be the least likely to participate. To examine factors that may influence attitudes toward and intentions to participate in OHP interventions, I apply the Sociocultural Self Model, or a framework that suggests that individual characteristics, structural conditions, and sociocultural context will influence an employee’s sense of self and thoughts, feelings, and behaviors relevant to health. Based on cross-sectional data from 315 employed adults recruited using a Qualtrics Panel, the Sociocultural Self Model generally conformed to model predictions. Individual characteristics, some structural conditions, and some sociocultural contexts were significantly related to attitudes towards and intentions to participate in OHP interventions. Results also suggest the presence of some industry-related differences in model components. Together, these results provide a preliminary look into the utility of a model that integrates individual and environmental determinants of health and safety to inform OHP interventions.

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Horan, K.A. You, me, and OHP: Applying the Sociocultural Self Model to OHP Interventions. Occup Health Sci (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41542-020-00079-w

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Keywords

  • Occupational health psychology interventions
  • Sociocultural self model
  • Health disparities
  • Determinants of health