Can the Fermionic Mind Hypothesis (FMH) Explain Consciousness? The Physics of Selfhood

Abstract

The recognition that the brain’s electric activities correlate with psychophysiology has encouraged the application of physical principles in the analysis of cognitive processes. Perception is an orthogonal transformation of the spatial organization of the physical world into a temporally organized system—the discrete processing of stimulus centers on the resting state. Information overload formulates a time pressure of stress and temporal excess spurs satisfaction. Both conditions enhance time perception but correspond to opposite emotions and attitudes. Emotions underlie all cognitive and processes by forming the fundamental motivations, attachments, and personal boundaries. Emotions have irresistible power over our behavior; by operating behind conscious awareness, they modulate what we see, hear, and think. The fermionic mind hypothesis (FMH) establishes consciousness as the smallest unit of intellect that operates via the principles of string theory, general relativity, and quantum mechanics. Adopting physical laws ensures survival by integrating the mind into the environment.

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Deli, E. Can the Fermionic Mind Hypothesis (FMH) Explain Consciousness? The Physics of Selfhood. Act Nerv Super (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41470-020-00070-4

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Keywords

  • Intelligence
  • Consciousness
  • Quantum mind
  • Emotions
  • Hard problem